Classics

Wednesdays with Woody: A Midsummer Night’s Sex Comedy (1982) 0
by / on May 16, 2012 at 9:11 am / in Classics, Film, Wednesdays with Woody

Wednesdays with Woody: A Midsummer Night’s Sex Comedy (1982)

A Midsummer Night’s Sex Comedy is notable for being the first Woody Allen film starring Mia Farrow, who would go on to be his muse on and off the screen in thirteen films.

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Wednesdays With Woody: Stardust Memories (1980) 0
by / on May 9, 2012 at 12:30 am / in Classics, Film, Wednesdays with Woody

Wednesdays With Woody: Stardust Memories (1980)

“Art and masturbation – two areas in which I am an absolute expert.”  – Sandy Bates. Following a negative screen-test of his latest movie, Sandy Bates agrees to attend a film festival held at the Stardust Hotel, to honour his older, funnier movies.

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Wednesdays with Woody: Manhattan (1979) 5
by / on May 2, 2012 at 12:14 pm / in Classics, Film, Wednesdays with Woody

Wednesdays with Woody: Manhattan (1979)

Many have named Manhattan Woody Allen’s greatest film; some, the greatest film of all time. Allen himself was reportedly so disappointed with it that he attempted to convince United Artists to never allow it to see the light of day.

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Wednesdays With Woody: Interiors (1978) 2
by / on April 25, 2012 at 8:57 am / in Classics, Film, Wednesdays with Woody

Wednesdays With Woody: Interiors (1978)

Interiors holds the distinction of being Woody Allen’s first entirely dramatic work, and while he has explored more serious subject matter in other parts of his later career, this was a marked shift from the screwball comedies of his early years.

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FAFA: Turkey Shoot (1982) 0
by / on April 20, 2012 at 10:17 am / in Australian Cinema, Classics, FAFA (Favourite Australian Film Assignment), Film

FAFA: Turkey Shoot (1982)

Turkey Shoot isn’t a masterpiece by any stretch of the imagination. It features a host of flawed acting, flawed special effects and due to a third of its budget being taken away at the last second, some extremely flawed production design.

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Wednesdays with Woody: Annie Hall (1977) 7
by / on April 18, 2012 at 8:55 am / in Classics, Film, Wednesdays with Woody

Wednesdays with Woody: Annie Hall (1977)

Often regarded as the original contemporary romantic comedy, Woody Allen’s Annie Hall has endured to be one of the most popular and critically acclaimed films from his incredibly prolific career.

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Film Review: The Evil Dead (1981) 1
by / on April 15, 2012 at 10:05 pm / in Classics, Film

Film Review: The Evil Dead (1981)

Hailed by Stephen King upon release in 1981 as “the most ferociously original horror film of the year”, The Evil Dead proudly continued in the footsteps of a long line of independent horror films in post World War II American cinema.

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Wednesdays With Woody: Love And Death (1975) 2
by / on April 11, 2012 at 8:08 am / in Classics, Film, Wednesdays with Woody

Wednesdays With Woody: Love And Death (1975)

Woody Allen and Diane Keaton teamed up again for this follow up to 1973’s Sleeper, respectively starring as Russian peasants Boris and Sonja, set during the Napoleonic Era. While ostensibly another absurdist comedy from Allen, this film’s blending of references to philosophy,

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Easter Film Review: The Last Temptation of Christ (1988) 0
by / on April 8, 2012 at 11:28 am / in Classics, Easter Films, Film

Easter Film Review: The Last Temptation of Christ (1988)

Released in 1988 to a storm of controversy, Martin Scorsese’s masterpiece The Last Temptation of Christ, adapted from the novel by Nikos Kazantzakis, departs dramatically from the gospels to show a Jesus entirely different from how he had previously been seen on the screen.

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Easter Film Review: The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965) 0
by / on April 6, 2012 at 2:32 am / in Classics, Easter Films, Film

Easter Film Review: The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965)

George Stevens’ The Greatest Story Ever Told, an adaptation of the New Testament, has something of a tarnished reputation as being one of the ridiculously expensive epics that almost bankrupted every major studio in the Old Hollywood.

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